Forum Posts

paninipiefactory
Jul 22, 2021
In General Discussion
Shakshuka Panini Pies are probably the most exotic in our current selection of Panini Pies, so an explanation is required. A Facebook friend of mine, an American expatriate living in the UK, called our Shakshuka Panini Pie an "in-your-face American invention". What he meant is that only in America could a Russian woman invent a product bringing together so many different cultures and give it an openly cross-cultural name. "Panini" is a plural form of the Italian Panino (sandwich), "shakshuka" means "mixture" or "shaken” in a Tunisian dialect, and "pie" is, of course, a multicultural word, but, it is also “as American as apple pie". Each of these words changed their original meaning: Americans discarded the distinction between Panino and Panini (as they did with spaghetto and spaghetti), shakshuka came to mean a dish of eggs poached in a sauce of tomatoes, chili peppers, other vegetables and spices, now a popular breakfast dish in the Middle East and North Africa, and pie, at least in the US, is a single or double-crusted dessert with sweet, flaky pastry. There are also savory variations, such as pot pies, meat pies (of English or Australian origin), and Irish shepherd's pie, but in all these cases, "pie" means a pastry or dough crust holding or enclosing a filling. The idea of Shakshuka Panini Pie came to me after a visit to Jerusalem. The smells and tastes of that city, whether those of Shuk Machane Yehuda or of the Arab market in the Old City, left a vivid impression on me. I brought home over $400 worth of spices, and I can still smell them in the now empty bag in which I carried them home two years ago. I used these spices to make several different versions of the original shakshuka, and I liked the smell and taste so much that I wanted to share it by putting shakshuka in my panini pies. It took many experiments to combine the moistness of the original shakshuka with a crust that didn’t fall apart. Genuine Middle Eastern spices can’t be replaced by ordinary supermarket ones, and when my Jerusalem stock was all used up, I found authentic replacements. Thus, the shakshuka panini pies were born. They are the most delicate of our pies and require special care when reheating to make sure that the crust does not fall apart. It is important not to thaw the pies too quickly: just let them sit in the refrigerator overnight before reheating. While a regular toaster will work, I would advise reheating shakshuka pies in a panini press, a skillet or a toaster oven, where the pie can lie flat during reheating. I look forward to hearing what everybody thinks about my Shakshuka Panini Pies.
Shakshuka Panini Pies content media
0
0
0
paninipiefactory
Jul 22, 2021
In General Discussion
Share your thoughts. Feel free to add GIFs, videos, #hashtags and more to your posts and comments. Get started by commenting below.
0
0
0
paninipiefactory
Jul 22, 2021
In General Discussion
We'd love to get to know you better. Take a moment to say hi to the community in the comments.
0
0
0
paninipiefactory
Jul 22, 2021
In General Discussion
We want everyone to get the most out of this community, so we ask that you please read and follow these guidelines: Respect each other Keep posts relevant to the forum topic No spamming
0
0
0
p

paninipiefactory

Admin
More actions